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Month: September 2015

The Graduate Economics Association of MIT held a celebration in honor of Adam Smith and the 200th anniversary of the publication of The Wealth of Nations.  The event took place April 12, 1976 at the Sheraton Commander Hotel in Cambridge, Massachusetts. I chaired the organizing committee for the event that was run like a Friar’s Club

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This list of suggested readings in Public Finance come from two of seven pages carbon copy, (stapled together, ordered by course number from Economics 1b through Economics 6. The pages are undated and no instructor is given. Nonetheless, based on the course catalogues and indications from several of the courses that the following annotated list

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Harald Hagemann (2011): European émigrés and the ‘Americanization’ of economics, The European Journal of the History of Economic Thought, 18:5, 643-671 Abstract The development of economics since 1945 was marked by an increasing internationalization that was simultaneously in large part a process of Americanization. This article focuses on the role refugee economists from Continental Europe

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    This reading list comes from Paul Samuelson’s second year at M.I.T. While not designated on the reading list itself, from its location in his papers (filed with other Business Cycle course materials) and according to the courses he taught that in the second term of 1943 (according to the MIT Course Catalogue), this

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This interdisciplinary moment comes as the result of my shallow acquaintance with American institutional economics. In the previous posting I ran across the name of M. S. Handman who was listed #2 in Frank Knight’s list of American Institutional Economists after Veblen but with the sarcastic addition “Perhaps the one true example , except Handman, who has

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Frank Knight’s teaching at Chicago covered four bases: core economic theory, the history of economics, social control of the economy and institutional economics.  One truly can’t fault 1930’s Chicago economics for failing to be aware of the surrounding disciplines. On the other side of the political spectrum we witness the same breadth in Paul Douglas’ 1938 course,

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While organizing my material from George Stigler’s papers, I ran across this reading list for an undergraduate macro course taught in 1973 at the University of Chicago by the then thirty year-old future professor of the so-called MIT gang that included Ben Bernanke, Mario Draghi, Olivier Blanchard, Maurice Obstfeld, and Paul Krugman (yes, there were

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Old David Hume, New iMac

2 years ago

    Teaching the History of Economics frequently involves dressing dead economists in 21st century attire. Here my attempt at adding a new twist to the sport at David Hume’s expense. I truly hope he isn’t spinning in his Mausoleum because of me. For Hume fans the original drawing by Louis Carrogis can be viewed here.  

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Today’s posting  comes from Norman M. Kaplan’s student notes from his graduate studies: a carbon copy of the reading list for Oskar Lange’s course at the University of Chicago given in the Autumn Quarter of 1941. The Course description from the 1941-42 course announcements: 307. Imperfect Competition.—A study of price formation and production under various transitional forms between

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Some 103 colleges and universities in the United States and Canada provided useable answers to a survey of higher educational institutions having annual instructional salary budgets of over $45,000 (note assistant professors at the time cost about $2,000 per year) conducted by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. Results were published in 1908

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