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Month: January 2016

In the following academic year (1940-41) this year-long course was broken into two distinct semester courses, Economics 1a (Economic Theory/Chamberlin) and Economics 1b (The Intellectual Background of Economic Thought/Taylor). From the enrollment statistics and the course catalogue we see that this was mainly a course taken in the junior year by undergraduates pursuing an A.B. with honors in

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Here we have a letter from the chairman of the Columbia University economics department, Edwin R. A. Seligman, to the chairman of the trustees of Columbia University, George L. Rives, boasting of the large market share of Columbia with respect to graduate education in economics and sociology. We’ve seen earlier (1900) that Seligman kept a jealous eye on

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Jacob Marschak’s course “The Theory of Income and Employment” was taught by the (visiting) assistant professor of economics and research associate in the Cowles Commission, Evsey D. Domar, in the Spring Quarter of 1948. The appointment must have taken place after the Announcements for 1947-1948 were published in May, 1947, so one presumes there was a

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Today we have the reading list for an early iteration of Lloyd A. Metzler’s second advanced course in international economics: the theory of foreign trade and commercial policy. The course was held in the Winter quarter of 1948 at the University of Chicago. I have used squared brackets and bold-blue text to indicate additions and

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At the University of Chicago graduate courses numbered in the 200’s were called “Intermediate Courses” and those in the 300’s were “Survey and problem courses in special fields…The main purpose…is to prepare students for research.” The 400’s courses were for “Research, reading, and seminars”. The Departmental course requirements for an M.A. in economics at the University

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    The Departmental course requirements for an M.A. in economics at the University of Chicago in 1949: “Normally fifteen courses (or their equivalent) in economics, eight of which ordinarily will be at the 300 level.” The courses numbered in the 200’s were called “Intermediate Courses” and those in the 300’s were “Survey and problem

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When Professor Edward Cummings of Harvard resigned his post in the summer of 1900, Harvard turned to the government economist William Franklin Willoughby who had published numerous pieces on labor issues and social welfare policies (several papers in the Quarterly Journal of Economics) to cover Cummings’ labor class for second semester of 1900-01. A second social

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Love him or hate him, this ex-Harvard president (etc, etc) has a keen eye for “what could possibly go wrong with that?” The entire interview ranges from the current campus controversies regarding “safe-spaces” and “micro-agressions” through boycotts of Israel and Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC). For Economics in the Rear-View Mirror the following observations are of interest,

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The undated reading list and bibliography for Henry Schultz’s advanced course “Theory and Measurement of Demand” transcribed below, included in Milton Friedman’s papers at the Hoover Institution Archives, are almost certainly from the Autumn quarter, 1934. This was the academic year that Friedman worked as Henry Schultz’s research assistant at the University of Chicago and audited the course.

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1 year ago

Not mine, but worth tweaking http://www.monde-diplomatique.fr/cartes/courantseco Source: This link thanks to a tweet by friend of Economics in the Rear-View Mirror, Rebeca G, Betancourt.

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