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Month: May 2016

Today’s posting is a transcription of the “correlation examination” questions for American economic history given at Harvard in May 1939. Concentrators in Economics will have to pass in the spring their Junior year a general examination on the department of Economics, and in the spring of their Senior year an examination correlating Economics with either History or Government (this

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Today’s posting is a transcription of the “correlation examination” questions for the economic history of Western Europe since 1750 given at Harvard in May 1939. Concentrators in Economics will have to pass in the spring their Junior year a general examination on the department of Economics, and in the spring of their Senior year an examination

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The following set of memoranda from the MIT economics department is found in a folder marked “Correspondence: Peter Temin” in Evsey Domar’s papers. The bulk of the material in the folder are letters of support that Domar solicited for the committee he chaired (which consisted of Domar, Charles Kindleberger and Frank Fisher) to review Peter

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Backstory: When I was an undergraduate I was extremely fortunate to have received an internship at the Council of Economic Advisers in Washington, D.C. Even though I was anything but a Republican and the semester-long internship began less than three months after the bungled Watergate break-in at the Democratic National Committee by the White House

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In the Fall term of 1948-49 assistant professor Richard M. Goodwin took over the graduate course in Mathematical Economics at Harvard from Wassily Leontief (who last taught the course during the academic year 1946-47). Earlier postings at Economics in the Rear-View Mirror for Goodwin: Reading list for a course on business cycles, Letters from Burbank and Schumpeter on Goodwin’s

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As mentioned in the previous posting, William Fellner of the University of California was called in to fill for Wassily Leontief’s graduate course in Advanced Economic Theory during the academic year 1950-51 at Harvard. Another course taught by Fellner that year was history of economics for undergraduates. Still only available in libraries or from used-book dealers is the

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The first theory course for economics graduate students around mid-20th century, Economics 201 (earlier 101), was taught most of the time by Edward Chamberlin. From his absence in the course announcements for 1950-51, Chamberlin was apparently on leave and Gottfried Haberler taught the first year of theory instead. Somewhat peculiar is Haberler’s written intention to

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What is a faculty-student party without skits and songs in which popular texts are given a good burlesque once over? An even duller affair to be sure. I am the first to admit that Economics in the Rear-View Mirror is a pretty dry boutique blog. Even my occasional attempts to liven things up are bound

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The following autobiographical remarks by James Tobin were circulated among the University of Chicago faculty before its Monday, February 13, 1950 meeting. After discussing the “Old Business” of the Committee Report on Ph. D. Thesis requirements and Departmental policy on library acquisitions, a third item added by hand to the mimeographed agenda was “C. Appointment

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