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Month: December 2017

    In 1948-49 Economics 1 replaced Economics A as the introductory course at Harvard. Really quite striking from today’s perspective are the economic history and history of economics questions from the first term and the Soviet planning questions in the second terms. You really have to be an old comparative economics researcher (or native

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  While Frank Taussig was off serving the country as the chairman of the United States Tariff Commission, his advanced economic theory course (Economics 11) was jointly taught by his colleagues Charles Bullock and Thomas Nixon Carver. The Harvard Archives collection of final examinations only has the June final examinations that are transcribed below, i.e.,

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  Information about economics courses offered for women by Harvard professors before Radcliffe College officially came into existence (1879-1893) were included in an earlier post. Today’s post provides course descriptions for the four course offerings in economics in Radcliffe’s first year of existence. Besides the obvious interest for the intersection of gender and history of

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    Examination questions spanning just over a half-century can be found in Frank Taussig’s personal scrapbook of cut-and-pasted semester examinations for his entire Harvard career. Until Schumpeter took over the core economic theory course from Taussig in 1935, Taussig’s course covering economic theory and its history was a part of almost every properly educated

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  The death of the benefactor of Harvard’s Department of Social Ethics, Alfred Tredway White (1846-1921), provided theĀ Harvard Alumni Bulletin an opportunity to review the history of the origins and progress of the interdisciplinary Department of Social Ethics established in 1905 which could trace some of its roots to the sociology course offerings of the

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  When I conducted a bit of scholarly due diligence to try to establish the date of a Harvard economics skitĀ I posted a few days ago (the script refers to the fact that Professor Vanek was leaving the Harvard department much to the regret of the skit-writers), I discovered that MIT Ph.D. alumnus, Jaroslav Vanek,

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  Because of the reference to Jaroslav Vanek’s leaving Harvard, we are able to date the following script to 1962-63 since Vanek left Harvard to work at the State Department in 1963. Almost everything about this script would lead me to conclude that it was used in a Harvard graduate student skit that somehow wound

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