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Category: Economists

    Reading the letter written by Wesley Clair Mitchell, the Director of Research at the NBER, to Arthur Burns in which Mitchell offers discouraging words regarding an appointment at NBER for Milton Friedman in 1945, it is interesting to see how Milton Friedman and his wife report on the controversy that very clearly influenced

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  The Silver and Gold Anniversary Class Reunions (25th and 50th, respectively) of Harvard College publish reports sent by class members to the class secretary. For answering the question, whatever happened to X, Class of ‘YY, these class reunion volumes can be useful. While it is not hard to discover what happened to Seymour Harris,

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      In the November 1884 issue of The Princeton Review Simon Newcomb polemicized  against the brochure by Richard T. Ely, issued by the Johns Hopkins University. Today’s posting provides the transcription of a September 1883 essay by Ely that was to be revised and expanded into that brochure published by Johns Hopkins University. This

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  This is an interesting early lance broken in the American version of the famed Methodenstreit that was taking place contemporaneously between Carl Menger and Gustav von Schmoller in Central Europe. Simon Newcomb represented the Menger side (pro-analysis and use of deduction) versus the historical/institutional side (pro-description and use of induction) that was represented by

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    For five Harvard economics Ph.D. candidates this posting provides information about their respective academic backgrounds, the six subjects of their general examinations along with the names of the examiners, the subject of their special subject, thesis subject and advisor(s) (where available). ________________________________________   DIVISION OF HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE EXAMINATIONS FOR THE DEGREE

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    The Johns Hopkins Ph.D., Henry Ludwell Moore, was a pioneer in the application of statistics to neoclassical economics. His most famous students were Paul H. Douglas and Henry Schultz.  ______________________ HENRY LUDWELL MOORE 1869- A.B., Randolph-Macon, 1892; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins, 1896. Instructor in Economics, 1896-1897, Lecturer in Political Economy, Johns

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    The Rare Book Reading Room of Economics in the Rear-view Mirror proudly announces the addition of a work that was written by Copernicus sometime before April 1526. It represents an early statement of the quantity theory of money. Copernicus, Nicolaus.  Monetae Cudendae Ratio (On the Coinage of Money). Latin and Polish translation (1854). Beginning p. 563 in Nicolai Copernici

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    The atomic bomb dropped on Nagasaki was less than two weeks history and the declaration of the surrender of Imperial Japan only five days old. Nothing says “back to business as usual” at the university better than active lobbying on behalf of one’s preferred candidate for an upcoming vacancy, as we see in the following memo

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    From my March 2017 expedition to the Johns Hopkins University archives’ collection of material from the Department of Political Economy, I came across one of those documents that help to provide an empirical baseline for the history of the market for economics professors. It is worth savouring the sets of tables one by

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      Both the economist Abba Lerner and the sociologist Daniel Bell can be seen in this 1944 exchange of letters to have considered themselves still at that time, to differing degrees of orthodoxy, of the Marxian persuasion. What caught my eye, in light of current macroeconomics debates, was Bell’s identification of “the confidence fairy” in

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