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Category: Exam Questions

After a glorious three week archive/library tour that has taken me from the Library of Congress in Washington to the Harvard Archives to the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library to the Johns Hopkins Archives and back to the Library of Congress, I have time before my flight back to Berlin for a post. Less than

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    While collecting old economics examination questions at the Harvard University Archives, I happened to come across a final examination for Political Economy from the pre-Dunbar years. The senior year course during the academic year 1868-69 was taught by Francis Bowen who assigned his own textbook, The Principles of Political Economy applied to the Condition, the

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  The exam questions seen below, even making an allowance for coming from an undergraduate course (nonetheless 13 of the 87 students were graduate students), indicate that the statistical training of economists at Harvard was a fairly low-grade affair even by the late 1930s, only a mechanical manipulation of different measures of central tendency and dispersion with a

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    In an earlier post I provided the course outline and readings for the first money and banking courses taught by Albert Gailord Hart during the depths of the Great Depression. Today’s post provides transcriptions of the final examination questions for the course. Interesting to note that the course final exam was spread over two days

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    ______________________ April 1, 1947 SUGGESTIONS FOR PREPARATION IN THE GENERAL FIELD OF STATISTICS Work in the two courses, Economics 121a and 121b, is in almost all cases an essential core of the preparation of the field of Statistics for General Examinations (requirements for the Special Field differ substantially), but such work does not

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  The first four pages of written notes taken by Milton Friedman for Jacob Viner’s course, International Trade and Finance, provide something of a course syllabus and list of suggested reading assignments. The notes are undated but in his civil service job applications, Friedman provided a list of courses by university, semester or quarter and

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  Working with the papers of John Maurice Clark is not for historians who abhor dirt and disorder. Simply imagine going into an attic and finding the papers of your grandparents dumped shelf by shelf, pile by pile, with or without the social contrivance of filing, and now image the dust of decades has penetrated the

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________________________ The original plan of Economics in the Rear-View Mirror was to provide a single artifact for each post. Larger (composite) data sets are given dedicated pages (e.g. Harvard Ph.D.’s in economics 1875-1926; Chicago Ph.D.’s in economics 1894-1926; Economics Rare Book Reading Room). Sometimes I come along a group of artifacts that are best kept together so I

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Hal R. Varian, chief economist at Google since 2007, was a 28 year old assistant professor at M.I.T. in 1975 when he taught my cohort the third in a sequence of four half-term courses that constituted MIT’s required core of graduate microeconomic theory. He assigned of draft chapters from his graduate textbook Microeconomic Analysis (published in 1977). For this post I have

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_______________________________ “Microeconomic Theory II”, the second of four half-semester core microeconomic theory courses at MIT, was actually the first offered during the academic year 1974-75. It was taught by Professor Robert L. Bishop. In this post we find 29 sample questions for the five sets of topics covered in the courses. Also included are the waiver

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