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Category: Salaries

  The following page comes from a folder holding miscellaneous items from George Stigler’s days at Columbia. One presumes it comes from a report, presumably before his time there, giving reference average salaries by rank for three budget years. Since salaries within a department are set with an eye to the university pay policy as

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In an old email (2003!) from my Berliner Humboldt Universität colleague/buddy Michael Burda, I found a gem he forwarded to me from Brad DeLong’s Semi-Daily Journal (July 6, 2003). I was unable to establish a link to the original page at DeLong’s current website.  Today’s post is an article from 1905 that provides spending data based on

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  The papers of the economic historian Earl J. Hamilton are a sammelsurium of boxes of folders with labels that are broadly chronologically descriptive but essentially useless. A scholar must plow through item by item, folder by folder as though in the attic of your deceased (messy) uncle who had hoarding issues, hoping to find

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Robert M. Haig was a public finance economist at Columbia University, the successor to Edwin R. A. Seligman as McVickar Professor of Political Economy. In Haig’s papers is the following memo from James Angell (the “Executive Officer”, i.e. chairperson, of the department of economics within Columbia’s faculty of political science) reporting the results of a

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Some 103 colleges and universities in the United States and Canada provided useable answers to a survey of higher educational institutions having annual instructional salary budgets of over $45,000 (note assistant professors at the time cost about $2,000 per year) conducted by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. Results were published in 1908

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Here is an item to file away under the cost of computing. Henry Schultz, the young hot-shot professor for mathematical economics and statistics wanted a fully-automatic Monroe calculator with an electric motor drive (pictured above). With discounts, the calculator and stand cost $631.  To get a relative price (in a hurry), I note that the

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