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Category: Statistics

    While I was unable to retrieve very much at all at the Library of Congress relevant to Walter F. Willcox’s teaching at Cornell, I did come across the following final examination in economic statistics from 1921. As can be seen from the questions, “statistics” was limited to meaning the tables of economic data compiled

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  Following up the previous posting about the department of political science at Cornell University in 1900, now I add two items of interest relating to the professor of economic statistics at that time, Walter F. Willcox, who lived to the ripe old age of 103(!). At the tender age of 93 Willcox was asked

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  The exam questions seen below, even making an allowance for coming from an undergraduate course (nonetheless 13 of the 87 students were graduate students), indicate that the statistical training of economists at Harvard was a fairly low-grade affair even by the late 1930s, only a mechanical manipulation of different measures of central tendency and dispersion with a

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    ______________________ April 1, 1947 SUGGESTIONS FOR PREPARATION IN THE GENERAL FIELD OF STATISTICS Work in the two courses, Economics 121a and 121b, is in almost all cases an essential core of the preparation of the field of Statistics for General Examinations (requirements for the Special Field differ substantially), but such work does not

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In his memo of February 1985 (Columbia University, A. G. Hart papers: Box 60, Folder “Sec I Notes on teaching materials, Learning”) Albert G. Hart wrote “I ducked the qualifying exam in statistics (in which for that date I was very well trained) because I disapproved of the focus of previous exams upon minor technicalities—hence

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Here we have a letter from the chairman of the Columbia University economics department, Edwin R. A. Seligman, to the chairman of the trustees of Columbia University, George L. Rives, boasting of the large market share of Columbia with respect to graduate education in economics and sociology. We’ve seen earlier (1900) that Seligman kept a jealous eye on

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Carroll D. Wright can be counted among the founding fathers of official government statistics in the United States. Here a few biographical details from an encyclopaedia published shortly after the paper below was presented. For impatient readers (sorry, he didn’t write with the Twitter-feeding generation in mind) my favorite quote: “Know thyself” applies to nations as well as

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