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Category: Syllabus

  If my extremely fuzzy recollection of the graduate course in American economic history taught at Yale in the spring semester of 1972 by William Parker and Paul Joskow is to be trusted, many if not most of the readings came from these two texts: American Economic Growth: An Economist’s History of the United States, Lance E.

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  For the second half of the first term of 1974-75, Martin Weitzman distributed a 100 page typescript for his lectures in the four half-course sequence of core microeconomic theory. The typescript consisted of 87 pages of lecture notes, 10 pages of final exam questions from previous years and three pages of course outline and

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  It is interesting to see that University of Chicago economics undergraduates in 1962 were still expected to learn something about mercantilism and classical international economic theory with a dash of Friedrich List as a chaser in Lloyd Metzler’s course on international monetary relations and policies. Oh yes, and Alfred Marshall gets into the act

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    Harvard University was able to switch into a three semester per year mode in the very first summer after the U.S. entered World War II. There were two versions of the standard Principles of Economics course offered, one which extended over the twelve week summer term and one very intensive version that covered

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  The Princeton course “International Economic Policies” was co-taught by Charles R. Whittlesey and Frank W. Fetter in 1934. Biographical material from their respective archival papers guides and the course syllabus are included in this post. ______________ Frank Whitson Fetter (1902-1992) 1899, May 22—Born, San Francisco, Calif. 1916—Graduate of Princeton High School, Princeton, NJ 1920 A.B.—Political

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  The following course outline with its readings is pretty much self-explanatory, though I cannot help but notice that there is quite a bit of Milton Friedman to read in Milton Friedman’s money course. It reminds me of the remark by Samuelson: One must not make the mistake attributed to Edward Gibbon when he wrote

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    The following reading list on the theory of income distribution taught by Fritz Machlup in the mid-1950s at Johns Hopkins University was found in a file in the Evsey Domar papers marked “Macroeconomics, Old Reading Lists”. I hadn’t realized until this post that Machlup’s papers are archived at the Hoover Institution, where 45

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