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Category: Undergraduate

    These are the last two statistical tables from the so-called “Cartel” summary report from December 1965 of leading economics departments in the U.S. intended to provide orientation for departmental chairpersons in salary negotiations. Today’s posting gives the numbers of undergraduate and graduate majors reported by 29 departments.  Earlier postings gave the distribution for full-professors, the distribution for associate professors, and the distribution

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    While collecting old economics examination questions at the Harvard University Archives, I happened to come across a final examination for Political Economy from the pre-Dunbar years. The senior year course during the academic year 1868-69 was taught by Francis Bowen who assigned his own textbook, The Principles of Political Economy applied to the Condition, the

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    Three handwritten pages of notes taken by Wolfgang Stolper sometime late in 1940 from what appears to have been a brain-storming session with his buddy Paul Sweezy were important enough to Stolper to have been saved by him in a folder filled with economics honors exams and course syllabi from his early years

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    In an earlier post Economics in the Rear-view Mirror provided the syllabus and readings for the Harvard course Economics 18b “Economic Aspects of War” offered in the Spring term of 1940. Today’s post provides information about course changes and faculty leaves that were early parts of “broad plans to orient its

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In 1912 the economics department of Harvard initiated a major study of economics instruction in the University that was completed in 1916 and published as:  The Teaching of Economics in Harvard University. A Report Presented by the Division of Education at the Request of the Department of Economics. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 1917. 248 pages. I will of

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Harvard’s decision to significantly increase its course offerings in political economy in 1883 received some national press coverage (that story posted earlier in Economics in the Rear-View Mirror). Today we have the announcement published in the Harvard Crimson. The trio Charles F. Dunbar, J. Laurence Laughlin and Frank W. Taussig were on their way to launch the take-off

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The popularity of the introductory course in economics at Harvard led Frank Taussig to establish a structure of two one-hour lectures per week with ca. 15 sections (of about 25 students) taught by four teaching assistants who administered (and presumably then graded) a 20 minute quiz on a week’s reading assignment that would be followed up

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For his 50th class reunion Paul A. Samuelson filled out the following one page questionnaire. Besides revealing the youthful musical taste of this Chicago educated Wunderkind, Samuelson’s responses sometimes even illustrate his writing style (e.g. 7 8/9 grandchildren). I was most struck by his declared favorite professor during these formative years. Guess, then read. ____________________________________

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Before heading off to the pastures of retirement, Harvard’s Arthur Eli Monroe taught a year-long undergraduate intermediate economics course, Economic Theory and Policy. His syllabi for 1947-48 show a serious attempt to weave contemporary textbook material with readings from major contemporary works and links to the history of economics. A less than serious attempt was made,

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