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Category: Wisconsin

    In the previous post we have the syllabus for the summer course Economics 150 (Economic Theory) taught by James S. Earley in 1940. It is interesting to compare that syllabus with the reading assignments transcribed below for the same course as taught by Milton Friedman at the University of Wisconsin sometime during the academic year

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  James S. Earley was an assistant professor of economics on leave from the University of Wisconsin during Milton Friedman’s year in Madison, 1940-41. The syllabus for his course transcribed for this post was found in Milton Friedman’s papers along with Friedman’s own syllabus for the course (next post). ____________________ James S. Earley, Life and resources. 1908

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The University of Wisconsin economist, Richard T. Ely, served as the general editor for the social science series entitled “The Citizen’s Library of Economics, Politics and Sociology.” He actually disliked the title “Citizen’s Library” that had been given by Macmillan.  He thought it would give an unintended popular stigma to the scientific works he intended to include (Benjamin G. Radar , The

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Here we have a letter from the chairman of the Columbia University economics department, Edwin R. A. Seligman, to the chairman of the trustees of Columbia University, George L. Rives, boasting of the large market share of Columbia with respect to graduate education in economics and sociology. We’ve seen earlier (1900) that Seligman kept a jealous eye on

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Appended to their Elementary Principles of Economics, Together with a Short Sketch of Economic History (1904), are  the following bibliographies of works that Richard T. Ely (Wisconsin) and George Ray Wicker (Dartmouth) “suggest that a school desiring to form a standard working library in Economics would do well to purchase”. A second edition was published

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The Dean of the University of Chicago’s College of Commerce and Administration, L. C. Marshall, submitted a proposal October 30, 1913 to President Harry Pratt Judson of the University of Chicago that outlined immediate steps for a transition from temporary arrangements for the College of Commerce and Administration to a permanent policy to go into

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The School of Political Science at Columbia University was divided into three groups of subjects: History and Political Philosophy, Public Law and Comparative Jurisprudence, and Economics and Social Science. Economics and Social Science comprised the two subject groups: Political Economy and Finance; Sociology and Statistics.  Seligman figured that of the approximately 135 graduate students specializing in economics in

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