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    The Statistical Laboratory at Columbia University in the second decade of the 20th century was run by the young assistant/associate professor, Robert E. Chaddock. An earlier post provided Chaddock’s 1911 request for equipment and literature for the Statistical Laboratory along with information about the calculating machines being considered and included a newspaper account

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  According to Martin Bronfenbrenner, the following problem set devised by Henry Simons for Chicago undergraduates in 1933 was a pedagogical Meisterstück (ok, he just said “one of the most famous problems in economic pedagogy”). It is likely that Paul Samuelson, who considered Simons his best teacher at Chicago, cut his teeth on this problem

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  The graduate economic seminary at Johns Hopkins University kept good records of the weekly sessions so that we know the names of all the presenters and their topics. I have added the academic backgrounds for graduate students and faculty alike from the published Johns Hopkins Circular. The economic seminary for the following year has

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  Today’s artifact is a sample short biography of an American economist that I found in The New International Encyclopaedia (eds.: F.M. Colby, H.T. Peck, and D.C. Gilman) that was published in New York City, 1902-04. This encyclopaedia looks like a convenient source of brief mid- and late-career assessments of the movers-and-shakers of economics at a

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  Today’s post was just intended to be a quickie set of five economics exams I found for the University of Toronto from 1891. There turned out to be much more interesting information at the hathitrust.org digital library that I simply had to include: from the University of Toronto Calendar, I was able to obtain

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  The following excerpts from the 1946-47 Announcement of Courses for the Faculty of Political Science at Columbia University provide a clear outline of the requirements and the sequence of thirteen steps an economics Ph.D. candidate needed to take to be successful in the quest for a doctoral degree. The rules and regulations are organized

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  The subject of oral examinations has come up in earlier posts:  Columbia 1932-3, Columbia 1967, and Harvard 1958. This post takes us to the immediate post-WWII years. For visitors to this page who are unfamiliar with the divisional organization of Columbia University earlier: the department of economics was located within the faculty of political science

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  Several earlier posts have considered foreign language requirements from the perspective of mid-20th century (e.g. Harvard, Columbia, Chicago). This post takes us back to the early years of graduate instruction at the end of the 19th century. The report by the “German Committee” submitted to the Board of Overseers of Harvard College in 1894

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  A few posts ago Economics in the Rear-view Mirror provided a transcription of a report written by a member of the Department of Economics Visiting Committee, John W. Morss, that shared his observations of teaching in the recitation sections of the principles of economics course (Economics A). Today we have the brief report submitted

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  It was from the Ilsa and Sam scene and the Rick and Sam scene from Casablanca that a mad M.I.T. economics graduate student was distilling his frenzy in 1978. That fourth year graduate student, Jeffrey Frankel, was the producer/head-writer for his cohort’s contribution to the annual skit party of the department of economics. At the time

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