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    This is the fourth table from the so-called “Cartel” summary report from December 1965 of 9-10 month salaries paid in U.S. economics departments. Table 4c give figures for the distribution of salaries for “freshly completed PhD’s” across the departments reporting. Previous postings gave the distribution for full-professors, the distribution for associate professors, and the distribution for assistant professors. The next

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    This is the third table from the so-called “Cartel” summary report from December 1965 of 9-10 month salaries paid in U.S. economics departments. Tables 3c give figures for the distribution of assistant professor salaries across the departments reporting. Last posting gave the distribution for full-professors and the distribution for associate professors. The next posting has the distribution for entering salaries for

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  This is the second table from the so-called “Cartel” summary report from December 1965 of 9-10 month salaries paid in U.S. economics departments. Tables 2c give figures for the distribution of associate professor salaries across the departments reporting. Last posting gave the distribution for full-professors. Future postings include the actual salary distributions for assistant professors and freshly completed

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    From my March 2017 expedition to the Johns Hopkins University archives’ collection of material from the Department of Political Economy, I came across one of those documents that help to provide an empirical baseline for the history of the market for economics professors. It is worth savouring the sets of tables one by

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    Yesterday, May 8 (2017) Economics in the Rear-View Mirror celebrated its second anniversary of providing transcriptions of material culled from archives both physical and electronic. These artifacts are relevant, most of the time, to my research project on the history of economic graduate and undergraduate economics in the United States from the late

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      Both the economist Abba Lerner and the sociologist Daniel Bell can be seen in this 1944 exchange of letters to have considered themselves still at that time, to differing degrees of orthodoxy, of the Marxian persuasion. What caught my eye, in light of current macroeconomics debates, was Bell’s identification of “the confidence fairy” in

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    John Kenneth Galbraith was the chairman of a committee commissioned to write a faculty minute in honor of John D. Black (1883-1960) who taught courses in the economics of agriculture at Harvard from 1927 through 1959. Anyone familiar with Galbraithian prose can see that this minute was overwhelmingly, if not exclusively, the work of Galbraith. I do

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    Every year from 1927/28 through 1931/32, Edward Chamberlin taught a semester-long course on the economics of transportation. The course outline with reading assignments was posted earlier. This posting provides us with a short course description published in the annual announcements of the Division of History, Government, and Economics, 1929-30, followed by the final examination questions

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