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Month: October 2015

Appended to their Elementary Principles of Economics, Together with a Short Sketch of Economic History (1904), are  the following bibliographies of works that Richard T. Ely (Wisconsin) and George Ray Wicker (Dartmouth) “suggest that a school desiring to form a standard working library in Economics would do well to purchase”. A second edition was published

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2 years ago

According to the course catalogue for 1950-51, this course was to be co-taught by Professor Alvin Hansen and Assistant Professor Richard Goodwin. (Official Register of Harvard University. Vol. 47, No. 23, September, 1950.) However, Goodwin did not receive tenure at Harvard and moved on to Cambridge University in 1950. In the following years material for this

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The object of the “general examination” for Harvard Economics Ph.D. students in 1911-1912 was “to ascertain the applicant’s attainments within a considerable range of subjects in the field of History, Political Science, or Economics.” The ordinary case would be that Ph.D. students would be “be examined in six subjects in all, chosen from the groups

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As the previous posting for Economics 370 (International Trade and Finance) taught by Jacob Viner at the University of Chicago during the Winter Quarter of 1944, this posting is based on detailed notes taken by Don Patinkin from which I have extracted a rough course outline with a corresponding list of assigned as well as suggested readings and references.  After

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  Don Patinkin took reasonably detailed notes in two of Jacob Viner’s three graduate courses in international economics in 1944 from which it is a fairly easy task to put together course outlines and the corresponding lists of assigned as well as suggested readings and references. Just as in his core economic theory course Economics

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The economics department at Columbia University was the product of an evolution that began in a heavily historical, interdisciplinary pool. As rare as the entrepreneurial spirit would appear in today’s deans (hey, some of my best friends have been/are deans and, through force of circumstance, I have had a sort-of “deandom” thrust upon me), in

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    We begin with an example of the honored academic tradition of a faculty minute entered into the record following the death of a present or former colleague. In the year that the Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel was awarded to Angus Deaton, in part, for his work

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Carl S. Shoup (New York Times obituary) taught a course at Columbia in the business school with the title “The balancing of government budgets” that was listed with economics department course offerings as “Economics b114”. One finds this course listed in the annual Bulletin of the Faculty of Political Science beginning in the Spring session

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Of six graduate courses taken for credit at Columbia University by Milton Friedman, one was taught by the Professor of Economic History, Vladimir Gregorievitch Simkhovitch — Economics 119. According to Friedman’s own listing of his coursework in economics found in his papers at the Hoover Institution Archives, he took Simkhovitch’s economic history course during the winter

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Robert M. Haig was a public finance economist at Columbia University, the successor to Edwin R. A. Seligman as McVickar Professor of Political Economy. In Haig’s papers is the following memo from James Angell (the “Executive Officer”, i.e. chairperson, of the department of economics within Columbia’s faculty of political science) reporting the results of a

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