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Category: Chicago

  How big was the split within the department of economics in 1950 at the University of Chicago? Judging from the decision by chairman T. W. Schultz to essentially table the matter of approaching the central university administration with a candidate for a permanent position, there was a departmental deadlock. The half-dozen economists discussed were:

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  Norman Kaplan’s handwritten  list of readings for Milton Friedman’s price theory courses (Economics 300A and 300B) taught during the winter quarter of 1947 at the University of Chicago has been posted earlier. That winter quarter was the first time Friedman taught Economics 300B and only the second time he taught Economics 300A. In Friedman’s

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  The title of the Christmas skit presented by the Graduate Economic Association players at MI.T. in December 1951 , “God and Keynes at M.I.T”, is a clear reference to the political screed, God and Man at Yale (1951), by the young and future conservative pundit, William F. Buckley, Jr. This is one of many MIT

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  In his magnificent article about the departmental politics behind the appointment of Milton Friedman at the University of Chicago in 1946, David Mitch refers in passing to a February 1946 memo written to the Chancellor and President of the University by Vice-President Rueben G. Gustavson in which the Vice-President reports on a discussion he

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    In 1939 a NYU graduate student, Alfred H. Bornemann, wrote to the University of Chicago economic historian Chester W. Wright requesting any of the latter’s personal memories of the first head of the Chicago Department of Political Economy, J. Laurence Laughlin. Bornemann’s letter and Wright’ response are transcribed below. Results from Bornemann’s project were

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      Today’s reading lists for the core Chicago course in price and distribution theory as taught by Harvard’s man in Chicago, Lloyd A. Metzler, in 1952 is virtually identical to that of his reading lists for 1948-49 posted earlier. There were only a few additions and few deletions. More interesting are comparisons with

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    __________________________ Every so often the tiny cultural studies scholar inside my economist body says it is time to post another artifact from the social life of an economics department. Annual Christmas parties, skit parties and picnics (less so) are occasions when economists attempt to write comedy and some popular or familiar song or

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      Today’s posting provides an observation from the paper-flow in reporting the results of Ph.D. field exams at the department of political economy of the University of Chicago in the 1920’s. Fields examined were capitalistic organization, government administration, trusts, economic history, and labor. Of the five Ph.D. students mentioned in the following Ph.D. field

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  The following recollections of John Maurice Clark of his earliest contacts with economic problems is found in a folder of his papers containing notes about his father, John Bates Clark. The hand-written notes are fairly clear until we come to a clear addition on the final page. Abbreviations are used there and the handwriting

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