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Category: M.I.T.

  In Robert Solow’s papers at Duke University I found the following “cut-and-paste” draft of a reading list for a course in applied price theory. That course, 14.144 (Applied Price Theory),  did not appear in the MIT course catalogue until the 1972/73 academic year, though it is conceivable and even likely that the topics course for 1971 was renamed and built

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1 month ago

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    From the following copy of a letter written by MIT President Karl Taylor Compton in June 1942 to the distinguished professor of international finance at Princeton, Frank D. Graham (1890-1949), we see that MIT at least considered adding a prominent senior person to its economic department but in the end decided to stick with the strategy of

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________________________ The original plan of Economics in the Rear-View Mirror was to provide a single artifact for each post. Larger (composite) data sets are given dedicated pages (e.g. Harvard Ph.D.’s in economics 1875-1926; Chicago Ph.D.’s in economics 1894-1926; Economics Rare Book Reading Room). Sometimes I come along a group of artifacts that are best kept together so I

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_______________________________ “Microeconomic Theory II”, the second of four half-semester core microeconomic theory courses at MIT, was actually the first offered during the academic year 1974-75. It was taught by Professor Robert L. Bishop. In this post we find 29 sample questions for the five sets of topics covered in the courses. Also included are the waiver

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From my files from graduate school I have transcribed the syllabus and final exam for the fourth of the four half-semester core microeconomic theory courses taught at M.I.T. during the academic year 1974-75. The topics of capital theory, uncertainty and welfare economics fell to Paul Samuelson. The preceding three half-semester microeconomics theory courses were taught by

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Robert Lyle Bishop was born June 4, 1916 in St. Louis, Missouri. He graduated summa cum laude from Harvard in 1937.  He was awarded a Sheldon Travelling Fellowship that financed a ten month study tour in Europe. He then went to Princeton for the following year (1938-9), but returned to Harvard where he received an

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_______________________________ This post is the second in the series dedicated to the economists who trained me (the first post about John Michael Montias is here). In the Evsey Domar papers archived at Duke University I found the following two-page, undated typed note about my Doktorvater’s own experience with his dissertation. Let us just say that his thesis committee

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____________ Today’s post is an excerpt from a script for a department faculty skit performed at the MIT Graduate Economics Association’s “Shawmut Follies” of 1967. The “skitwrights” were Duncan Foley and Peter Temin who adapted the lyrics from tunes taken from the popular musical Camelot (based on the legend of King Arthur and his Knights

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Robert Solow taught the course Advanced Economic Theory at MIT in the Spring of the 1961/62 academic year. Of the dozen graduate students who took the course for credit were a future Nobel prize winner (Peter Diamond), a future Princeton professor and later member of Jimmy Carter’s Council of Economic Advisers (Stephen Goldfeld), a future

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6 months ago

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Coming up will be the reading list(s) and exam for the course Economics 14.123 (Advanced Economic Theory) taught by Robert Solow in the Spring semester of the 1961-62 academic year at M.I.T.  _____________________ May, 1962 GENERAL EXAMINATION—ADVANCED THEORY Answer question 1 and 3 others. Make a catalog of the kinds of situations in which resource

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