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Category: Michigan

_______________________________ This post is the second in the series dedicated to the economists who trained me (the first post about John Michael Montias is here). In the Evsey Domar papers archived at Duke University I found the following two-page, undated typed note about my Doktorvater’s own experience with his dissertation. Let us just say that his thesis committee

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In preparing the previous post about the Harvard trained economist, Zenas Clark Dickinson (Ph.D., 1920), I ran across his history of the University of Michigan economics department that was published in 1951. The first volume of the Encyclopedic Survey of the University of Michigan was published in 1941 and it is clear from the text of

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The David A. Wells Prize for 1919-20 was awarded to Zenas Clark Dickinson (Harvard Ph.D., 1920) for his dissertation Economic Motives: A Study in the Psychological Foundations of Economic Theory, with some Reference to Other Social Sciences (Harvard University Press, 1922). In this posting we have the Ph.D. General Examination subjects for Dickinson along with biographical

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The economist Richard T. Ely was 25 years of age with a freshly earned Heidelberg doctorate when he wrote the following article on American colleges and German universities in late 1879 or early 1880 while still in Germany. According to his autobiography, he was down to his last three pfennige when the check came in

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After the last posting I wondered what had become of Frederick Converse Clark, assistant professor of economics at Stanford during its earliest years. In such matters it is useful to head off to a genealogical website such as Ancestry.com  to get a lead. In a family tree at ancestry.com, the

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The Cornell professor of history Herbert Tuttle, America’s leading expert on all matters Prussian, wrote the following warning in 1883 against the wholesale adoption of German academic training in the social sciences. Here we see a clear battle-line that was drawn between classic liberal political economy in the Anglo-Saxon tradition and mercantilism-made-socialism from the European

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COURSES IN ECONOMIC AND POLITICAL SCIENCE, AMERICAN COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES. Amherst College Brown University Bryn Mawr College Columbia College Cornell University Harvard University Johns Hopkins University Indiana University University of Michigan University of Nebraska College of New Jersey (Princeton) University of Pennsylvania Smith College Vassar College Wellesley College Williams College Yale University   AMHERST

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George Stigler’s research file for his paper “Henry Calvert Simons” (The Journal of Law & Economics, Vol. 17, No. 1 (Apr., 1974), pp. 1-5) includes the following artifacts that provide us with a complete, or at least near complete, listing of undergraduate and graduate coursework of the “Crown Prince of that hypothetical kingdom, the Chicago

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Here an except from the University of Michigan’s Survey of the behavioral sciences, the fourth university of five participating in the Ford Foundation Project of 1953-54 on the behavioral sciences. Harvard, Chicago, Stanford and Michigan’s reports are in the public domain and available at hathitrust.org. I have been unable to locate the University of North

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This interdisciplinary moment comes as the result of my shallow acquaintance with American institutional economics. In the previous posting I ran across the name of M. S. Handman who was listed #2 in Frank Knight’s list of American Institutional Economists after Veblen but with the sarcastic addition “Perhaps the one true example , except Handman, who has

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