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Month: August 2015

This reading list for J. W. Angell’s courses on Money and Banking at Columbia University from 1933 was found in Milton Friedman’s papers at the Hoover Institution. _____________________ READING LIST IN MONEY AND BANKING (Economics 127-128) Revised: 1933 # Required reading. ## Required reading, to be prepared for class-room discussion. It will be found advisable,

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Graduate classes in Mathematical Economics (Econ 13b in 1934-35, Econ 104b in later years) were taught every second year by Edwin Biddle Wilson (1934-35, 1936-37, 1938-39, 1940-41, 1942-43). An introduction for undergraduates and graduates was offered by Joseph Schumpeter in 1934-35 (Econ 8a), but the course was taken over and offered for nearly a decade by

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The Committee on Instruction of the Columbia University Faculty of Political Science (consisting of the four departments of public law, history, economics and sociology) circulated the following memorandum regarding the oral subject examinations for the Ph.D. degree. One is struck at both the apparent informality and variation of practice in the matter at the time

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The Dean of the University of Chicago’s College of Commerce and Administration, L. C. Marshall, submitted a proposal October 30, 1913 to President Harry Pratt Judson of the University of Chicago that outlined immediate steps for a transition from temporary arrangements for the College of Commerce and Administration to a permanent policy to go into

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Welcome to my blog, Economics in the Rear-View Mirror. If you find this posting interesting, here is the list of “artifacts” from the history of economics I have already assembled for you to sample or click on the search icon in the upper right to explore by name, university, or category. You can subscribe to my blog below.  There

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    While still an assistant professor of political economy at Harvard, J. Laurence Laughlin (who went on to become professor and first head of  the Chicago department of political economy) included the following bibliography of works that together would constitute “A Teacher’s Library”. I provide here links to almost every item on the Laughlin List.

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In the previous post we have a syllabus with links to the assigned readings for the full-year course Economics 8, Principles of Sociology, taught at Harvard by Professor Thomas Nixon Carver. This copy of the printed exam questions for the first term of the academic year 1922-23 was found in the papers of Vernon Orval Watts in

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2 years ago

Economics 8, Principles of Sociology, was taught by Professor Thomas Nixon Carver in 1917-18. The course could be taken by both undergraduates and graduate students. 17 students were registered (7 Seniors, 8 Juniors, 2 other classifications). Links to all readings are provided! Added later to Economics in the Rear-View Mirror: mid-year exam questions (from February 1923 for

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2 years ago

In the December 1898 issue of the Columbia University Quarterly an overview of the curriculum for economics and social science (i.e. sociology with a bit of anthropology without political science that was split between the subjects  of history and public law) offered by the Faculty of Political Science was sketched by Professor Richmond Mayo-Smith. I have

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