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Category: Harvard

  Frank W. Taussig only offered this intermediate level economic theory course twice. It was sandwiched in between his principles of economics course and the graduate economic theory course. ____________________ Course Description, 1917-18 7a 1hf. Economic Theory . Half-course (first half-year). Tu., Th., at 2.30, and (at the pleasure

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  Exams for the first term of the two term sequence of sociology (“Analytical Sociology) were transcribed for the previous post.  ________________ Course Description 1916-17 18b 2hf. Historical Sociology. Half-course (second half-year). Tu., Th., and (at the pleasure of the instructor) Sat., at 2.30. Asst. Professor Anderson.             The course will involve a study of the

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  This post, besides providing information for a course in the Harvard economics curriculum during the early 20th century, also serves as a gentle reminder just how long academic sociology in the United States was treated as a subfield within the discipline of economics. In 1914-15, Assistant professor Benjamin M. Anderson, Jr. taught the sociology course

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  This post provides Wolfgang Stolper‘s own description of his academic training, teaching and research interests as of early 1941 in a letter to the President of Hobart College regarding his application for an assistant professorship. Stolper’s Harvard coursework for 1934-37 was transcribed for an earlier post. He was on the job market for the 1941-42

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  Today’s artifacts come from the roaring ’20s. Besides his courses in economic theory, Allyn A. Young taught a year long course at Harvard, “Money, Banking and Commercial Crises”. Before presenting enrollment figures and the exams for Young’s Economics 3, I have assembled a chronology that identifies the course instructors over the entire period 1911-1946. Links

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  What is nice about this particular economic history reading list is that it is not an extended bibliography but actually quite limited and specific, thereby giving us a better sense of the actual course content. The reading list had 1933-34 crossed out in the heading and 1934-35 penciled in. Note as of 1933-34, the Harvard

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  Here we have a memo written by member of the Columbia University economics department executive committee, Albert G. Hart, that presents the results of what appears to be his informal polling of the chairpersons of 21 departments. Fifteen of the departments provided the salary ranges at four different ranks. No further details are provided,

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    Wassily Leontief’s first appointment at Harvard was at the rank of instructor for the academic year 1932-33. The first course he taught was Economics 18 (Price Analysis) that was taken by two graduate students for credit during the fall semester. Leontief then taught Economics 39 (International Trade and Finance) in the second semester. I

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    Harvard University was able to switch into a three semester per year mode in the very first summer after the U.S. entered World War II. There were two versions of the standard Principles of Economics course offered, one which extended over the twelve week summer term and one very intensive version that covered

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  In an earlier post Economics in the Rear-view Mirror provided the undergraduate and graduate academic transcripts of Earl J. Hamilton, who besides having gone on to a distinguished career as a leading economic historian also served as the editor of the Journal of Political Economy for seven years. For this post I have transcribed

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